History of Furzedown

In 1911, the then London County Council decided that a temporary school for 240 children was needed on the site and two years later on March 3rd 1913 the school was opened. Housed in two iron buildings it was nicknamed ‘The Tin School’.

As a result of the First World War it wasn’t until 1924 that work began on a permanent building. The new school, which cost £18,000 to build, was designed to accommodate 400 infants in a small bungalow building with a small yard on one side and lawns on the other. This new building was opened on April 17th 1928.  It was built first of all as a school for asthmatics and the side walls of the classroom were concertinaed so that they could be peeled open and fresh air (or a draught) would pass through.

Furzedown was closed for the duration of the Second World War and used as a store for paper and books. It reopened on August 30th 1948 as an Infant and Nursery School. Children aged 7 and over were sent to Mitcham Lane Junior School (now called Penwortham School). Hutted classrooms were added in September 1951 and 1973.

In 1970 Furzedown was reorganised as an Infants and Junior School. In 1990, a major rebuilding programme was carried out in the school. Furzedown now caters for boys and girls aged 3 – 11.

In 2002 a major expansion of Furzedown took place. A new wing was added which comprised of seven new classrooms, a meeting room and infant toilets. This addition enabled the school to increase the intake of children and to begin the process of growing from a 1.5 form entry in 1970, all the way through to two form entry.

In 2012 the school added an Art Box…. A first floor extension that was built above the old library.

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